All Posts By

Stephen Fitzgerald

Colorado: Rodeo Team Night Nov 10th

By Quickies No Comments

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RSVP HERE:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rodeo-labs-2016-colorado-team-hangout-night-tickets-29023844099

2016 is drawing to an end and we haven’t yet had a proper team party and get together. We need to fix that! If you are Rodeo or if you might be Rodeo but aren’t sure then come on out and meet your team mates and friends in the real world. Rodeo does a lot online but one thing we want to do is get better at getting the crew together in the real world. We’ve got people flying the colors all over the world so it’ll be difficult to get everyone together, but if we could get a solid crew of Colorado people under one roof that will be a great place to start!

 

Dinner and some drinks will be provided. Currently we are leaning towards some sort of taco setup from a local food truck but that isn’t quite locked down yet. If you have a favorite drink or brew bring a six pack to share.

YOU REALLY NEED TO RSVP if you are coming so we know what to plan for. You CAN bring friends, etc but you need to RSVP them. Kids are allowed but it might not be the best idea to bring them because there is finite space and they tend to get a bit bored at bike hangout events.

On the agenda:

1. Hang out and meet more of the team in real life. Connect names and faces.

2. Talk about what it means to be on the Rodeo team.

3. Talk about what we’re getting right and what we should be doing better such as:

– Group rides

– Rallys

– Communication

– Including more people

– Drawing out lurkers

– Road trips (2017)

– Races? (2017)

– Etc

– Ideas from EVERYONE are welcome.

4. Discuss the possibility of a team board of some sort to help break leadership into bite sized chunks.

5. Talk about leadership incentives.

6. Talk about how Rodeo the bike company relates to the team.

7. Eat food

8. Drink things

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Rodeo Belgium, 2016. Day 1

By Adventures No Comments

The beauty of being a fan of bike racing is that if you have the time and will power you can stand mere inches from the legends of the sport. Or, if you’re slightly over-excited you can grab them by the butt and push them up hills as they sail by.

Rodeo visited Belgium in 2015 and had a blast, so we went back this year with an even bigger group and had an even bigger blast.

Writing up a 10 day trip to cycling’s holy land is a tall order. It could take days to compose. I don’t have days to write words, but I do have photos. Lots of photos.

It’s time to share some photos.

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“At least we’re here”

By Adventures No Comments

In August a group of Rodeoers in Colorado struck out on a ride through roads not-yet-ridden-by-us. The ingredients that make these sorts of rides are always dynamic. Peder had been brewing on a Mosquito Pass expedition for years, Jered was in town and wanted to do big high mountain rides, and I tossed out the invite to the team. Eight of us jumped in on the adventure.

The word “Adventure” is rapidly transitioning from an awe-filled catalyst to a very tired marketing word these days. Flip through any cycling magazine and you can’t go very many pages without seeing a tidal wave of products advertised as the very keys you need in order to unlock this mythic “new” genre of our sport.

And yet, true adventure is unimpressed by the collective marketing departments of our industry. True adventure has been happening for centuries and will continue to happen long after humanity has achieved singularity with holo-lenses and virtual experiences. Adventure just means pointing your willing self into the unknown and having the naivete, courage, or even audacity to proceed directly into it. No fancy gear required.

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The Road Not Taken

By Adventures No Comments

 

A poem by Robert Frost

 

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,

And sorry I could not travel both

And be one traveler, long I stood

And looked down one as far as I could

To where it bent in the undergrowth;

 

 

Then took the other, as just as fair,

And having perhaps the better claim,

Because it was grassy and wanted wear;

Though as for that the passing there

Had worn them really about the same,

 

 

And both that morning equally lay

In leaves no step had trodden black.

Oh, I kept the first for another day!

Yet knowing how way leads on to way,

I doubted if I should ever come back.

 

 

I shall be telling this with a sigh

Somewhere ages and ages hence:

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.

 Photos by Stephen Fitzgerald and Galen Stiglebauer / Colorado Cycling Adventures:

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Life with a Donkey

By Gear No Comments

Words and photos by Rod Hart. Washington State, USA.

A summer spent riding a Donkey and relearning that where the pavement ends, fun and adventure usually begins!

Donkeys, aka Asses, are very versatile, loyal, stubborn, and long living animals. In Animal Farm, Benjamin, the donkey, refuses to join the rebellion knowing the one type of tyranny will ultimately be replaced by another. My donkey, aptly named Donkey, has been extremely loyal, versatile, and stubborn…qualities I possess, making us great companions.

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My adventures on Donkey began at the Dirty Kanza 200. I had yet to see my donkey, but I knew that we would be fast friends and lifelong companions. As soon as Donkey was unboxed and assembled I was in love, and ready to challenge myself at DK200. Unbeknownst to me, Donkey knew quite a bit about me. Donkey knew that I had been injured all spring and unable to train, Donkey knew that I was going to be stubborn, and Donkey knew that I was ill prepared for the challenge ahead…Donkey was also willing to push the limits to help me try and achieve glory. Sadly, through a series of misfortunes, Donkey and I were unable to finish DK200. We did give the good fight, and managed to ride nearly 60 miles without a rear derailleur.

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Over the course of my DK60, Donkey carried me across the Flint Hills of Kansas. The hills consisted of mud, hard pack, dirt, gravel, dry riverbed crossings, and actual river crossings. Donkey was able to swiftly carry me up the steep gravel grades, and with stability and agility down ludicrously fast gravel descents. Hitting a 1-2 foot deep, dried gravel creek bed, at 35 mph could normally be a recipe for disaster, but not for Donkey…Trail Donkeys are designed for tough conditions, conditions that others would wither and crack in, conditions that make others want to curl up into a ball and cry. Donkey not only passed the test multiple times, Donkey kept jumping at the challenges and passing each one. Sadly finishing all 200 miles was not meant to be, but I learned quickly that Donkey was up for any challenge.

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Once back in Washington, Donkey and I have continued to forge our relationship. We travel deep into the mountains on steep paved roads. We travel through small towns looking for adventure. We travel deep into the windswept Columbia River Gorge exploring gravel roads with steep ascents and descents. All of these are prime riding locations for Donkey, and Donkey has successfully conquered each of the conditions. I have yet to find something Donkey does not excel at:

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Descending roads at 50+ mph, check.

 

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Climbing switchback after switchback looking for the next corner of scenery, check.

 

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Climbing and descending horrible washboard that makes your insides want to come out, check.

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Being a pack mule so I can travel the gorge without fear of where I will find a water stop, check.

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It has only been one summer, which isn’t even over yet, and I already know that I am in love. I am always excited when I see Donkey ready to go each morning, ready for some adventure that I am ill prepared for, and knowing that whatever conditions lie ahead I will surely come home safe with a good story and a picture (or 1000).

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